Elmira-area manufacturer seeks zoning change needed for expansion
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Elmira-area manufacturer seeks zoning change needed for expansion

An Elmira-area business is looking to significantly increase it manufacturing capabilities. To that end, it’s  seeking a change to the zoning of the property at 6455 Reid Woods Dr. and 6919 Line 86.

The agricultural land currently has site-specific zoning permitting the manufacturing of farm-related machinery. Now, Tubeline Manufacturing Ltd. wants to remove restrictions on building size and to reduce the number of required parking spaces.

The business is looking to add a 103,000-square-foot building to the site, which is currently home to three smaller structures. As well, the zone-change application calls for parking requirements to be halved, to 140 from 280.

A planner representing the company this week told Woolwich councillors the changes would allow for better use of the 18-acre site, which is “not viable” for farming.

Brian Shantz said the property has been used for manufacturing since the late-1950s. It’s been home to Tubline since 2011, where the company makes the likes of bale wrappers and manure spreaders.

Expansion plans would see up to 60 full-time jobs at the site, he added at Monday night’s public meeting.

For neighbour David Chochol, the expansion was cause for some concern.

He told councillors that while Tubeline has been a “respectful” neighbour, that hasn’t always been the case with former owners of the site adjacent to the farm property his family has owned for 30 years.

Where current plans see parking along the property line, Chochol called for changes that would reduce the impact on his property. He also expressed concerns that the planned location for snow storage could plug a nearby culvert, causing flooding on the family’s low-lying property.

He also raised issues around noise and light mitigation, as well as privacy concerns.

“Given the massive scale of the proposed expansion, why has fencing and functional landscaping to help screen the use and maintain a degree of privacy for our home and farm not been considered? We would request further mitigation, at minimum, is required in light of the proposal. We would also like assurances that the noise mitigation will be implemented, and that no lighting impacts will be permitted onto our lands and primary residence,” he said in a written submission.

“Concerning the proposed magnitude of the servicing system in order to support employment of roughly 150 people, in addition to the manufacturing uses on site, we would like to better understand what protections are in place to ensure that the quality of our well for drinking water and agricultural/irrigation purposes is not impacted as a result of the proposed use?”

Shantz noted that the majority of the neighbour’s concerns have been addressed in plans for the site.

“We do need and will provide additional visual screening along the common or south property line,” he said, noting trees are to be planted.

Monday night’s meeting was for information only, with council making no decisions. A vote will come at a later date when planning staff have taken feedback and drafted a written report.

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