It’s buyer beware ... but only if you’re caught
Woolwich & Wellesley Township's Local Community Newspaper | Elmira, Ontario, Canada
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It’s buyer beware … but only if you’re caught

When I started hunting, there was a commonly held belief that was often repeated. It said, “Beware the hunter with one gun. For he knows how to use it.”

The phrase was meant to suggest that if you had only one firearm, you would be very familiar with its idiosyncrasies, operation, how it shot and handled. And since you only used that gun, you would grow to be very fast and more accurate with it in the field.

On the flipside, that theory also indicated that if you had more than one firearm, your brain would be bogged down with all the complexities of each, and you wouldn’t be as good as you could be with any of them.

In hindsight, I suspect this phrase was invented by spouses who thought that the money spent on one gun was enough. I also believe the archery industry was in on it.

Regardless, for the longest time, this phrase worked on the most gullible members of the hunting community. Or at least that was my excuse.

My first hunting gun was a pump shotgun that I used for everything from snipe to bear hunting. And, yes, that was my only gun. For years in fact.

But whether any game animal thought they needed to beware of me is questionable. I can say with certainty, however, that the clay pigeons of the day certainly did not. And many ducks flew over me with more confidence than I would have preferred.

Luckily, a good friend gave me a good reason to buy a second hunting firearm.

For he owned just one gun too and was arguably the worst shot in the world. His shooting led me to believe the phrase was actually meant to be, “Beware the hunter with one gun, unless you are standing right in front of his intended target. “

Time with him convinced me to forget about limiting myself to one gun.

And, for this, the gun industry owes him a huge debt of gratitude.

Soon after, I purchased a bolt-action .22. This was followed by a deer rifle for heavy cover and then a long-range deer rifle for use across open fields and then a bear and moose rifle followed by an over-and-under 20 gauge and lever-action and semi-auto .22, a .222, a 5 mm, a semi-auto 12 gauge, a couple of very expensive air rifles and so on.

It turned out none of these things diminished my level of competency in the least. None of them increased it either.

But they did make me a better hunter in unexpected ways.

For instance, I got very good at sneaking firearms into my house. And this sort of stealth also comes in handy in the field. Heck, I’m pretty sure I could tip-toe through a herd of skittish deer, if I pretended I was carrying a new and expensive shotgun in the house.

I’d also like to say that the freedom to buy more firearms allowed me to contribute to the economy on a scale I never dreamed of before. You’re welcome. Because of me, several firearms industry salespeople’s kids went to university.

There are other advantages of owning several firearms too. The more firearms you have, the less you use each, which makes easier to sell as almost new, when your spouse finds out about them.

A little more local for your inbox.

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