Falling gas prices something to get pumped about
Woolwich & Wellesley Township's Local Community Newspaper | Elmira, Ontario, Canada
Help
Follow

A little more local for your inbox.

Seven days. One newsletter. Local reporting about people and places you
won't find anywhere else. Stay caught up with The Observer This Week.

Enter your email to subscribe. Unsubscribe anytime. We may send you promotional messages.
Please read our privacy policy.

Falling gas prices something to get pumped about

Dropping gas prices are a welcome change for drivers across the region, but it doesn’t mean they plan to do any additional driving. [Whitney Neilson / The Observer]

Anyone planning on driving to their Christmas destination of choice in a couple weeks has plenty to smile about as gas prices have dropped as low as 99.9 cents per litre in some parts of the region.

Dropping gas prices are a welcome change for drivers across the region, but it doesn’t mean they plan to do any additional driving.[Whitney Neilson / The Observer]
Dropping gas prices are a welcome change for drivers across the region, but it doesn’t mean they plan to do any additional driving. [Whitney Neilson / The Observer]
The Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) says Canadian average retail gas prices have hit a four-year low and the trend will likely continue through the holiday season.

And while you might think this would mean more people are filling up, gas station workers in Elmira are still seeing much of the same.

Erin Zach at Petro-Canada said their current price of $1.019 is the lowest she’s seen it since the station opened. She said there was a morning rush of drivers pulling in to fill up, but aside from that it had been pretty normal, no increase in traffic.

“I haven’t really noticed. I haven’t heard a thing,” Zach said.

It was much of the same at Esso, just up the street.

When asked if he’d seen more drivers getting gas, Trent Robertson thought for a moment and then shook his head.

“Actually, no,” Robertson said.

He said people are coming in smiling, but they’re not driving more just because the price is down.

“People are in a much better mood,” he added.

Robertson said in May of 2003 he was selling gas for 52 cents a litre. The cheapest he’s ever seen it was 22 cents.

The CAA’s gas price monitor notes the average national retail price in Canada was $1.11 per litre on December 1, the lowest price since December 2010.

Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) said this week it will continue to put out 30 million barrels of oil a day, despite the demand falling to 28.9 million barrels next year. This year’s demand for oil was 29.4 million barrels per day. OPEC manages a third of the world’s oil production.

Shyann Peters, who also works at Esso, said they had a rush on Tuesday in the afternoon, but it didn’t last long.

“It’s hard too because people are at work all day,” Peters said. “Some guy came in and said it should be 70 cents. He was a true Albertan.”

On December 8, a barrel of crude oil was listed at US$69, a $6 decrease since last week. The declining cost of crude oil is linked to the global oil glut, a higher U.S. dollar, and less demand. Gas prices have dropped as much as 40 per cent since mid-summer.

“For many Canadians this week, the gas pump will be putting the smallest dent in their wallets in the last four years,” said Jeff Walker, CAA vice president of public affairs.

“The sharp drop in prices of crude oil over the past couple of months is finally being reflected in Canadian retail prices.”

Just two weeks ago, these were the average prices across the country: Vancouver: 124.9, Edmonton: 91.9, Calgary: 98.9, Regina: 102.9, Winnipeg: 99.4, Toronto: 113.9, Ottawa: 102.9, Montreal: 116.4, Fredericton: 109.9, Halifax: 115.9, Charlottetown: 116.9, and St. John’s: 115.4.

In places like Alberta and Newfoundland, the lower prices are not so welcome. Both Alberta Premier Jim Prentice and Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Paul Davis have said they’ll have to watch their budgets closely.

Regardless, drivers in Ontario and elsewhere are relieved to have a little extra change for Christmas.

Manjit Kaur at UPI Energy in Elmira said she’s heard some seniors complaining because regardless of the price, gas is still an expense on a fixed income. Otherwise, customers seem to be enjoying the break from rising petrol costs.

“Yes, everyone’s happy,” Kaur said. “There’s a big difference.”

A little more local for your inbox.

Seven days. One newsletter. Local reporting about people and places you
won't find anywhere else. Stay caught up with The Observer This Week.

Enter your email to subscribe. Unsubscribe anytime. We may send you promotional messages.
Please read our privacy policy.

Total
0
Shares



Related Posts
Total
0
Share